Oblation Baby - More Options Available

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these little faces on folded cards have an elusive quality that somehow elicit the response, ‘adorable!’, from anyone who holds them in their hand. illustrations by pascale rich.

3 ½ x 5 inch heavy cream cardstock - letterpress printed with hot foil and soy ink - packaged with gold envelope and in clear sleeve

when you hold in your hand the soft handmade paper with deep letterpress impression, made daily at oblation papers & press, you immediately sense the rarity of the object. since 1989, ron and jennifer rich and their creative team of artisans and designers have carved out their niche with textural handmade papers beautifully suited to that letterpress bite. this soft paper is made by hand from pure cotton, sourced from recycled remnants of the garment industry. its toothy surface is beautifully suited to highlight the deep impression made by letterpress in our cards and handbound books. after macerating the recycled cotton in a hollander beater and heavy sheets of handmade paper are pulled from watery vats to print one at a time on cast iron presses... all on view from oblation’s retail paper boutique in portland, oregon. the edges are not cut or torn, but naturally shaped as part of the papermaking process, using the tools of the trade: a wooden frame with mesh screen called a mould and a wooden frame without mesh known as a deckle. after the mould and deckle are drawn up through the vat together, the deckle is lifted from the wet, glistening paper and the deckled edges are revealed. oblation papers & press was founded on practicing a green approach and we follow recycling principals that focus on reuse and conservation. sustainability is in our roots and we use soy ink, wind power, and reclaimed antique letterpresses that will outlive us all!

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